Synoptic: Filling out the tutorial room.


It’s coming to the end of week 5 and we’re now in full control of our slippery slide from last week. With the burn down chart completed and updated, development can now go into full swing; lets start with Unity and all of its bits and bob’s.

Firstly, we now have a working mechanic that opens the door when the button comes on collision with another object such as a ball (that was actually set specifically). This was used by the animator window which I’m yet to understand as I needed some assistance coming into this entirely new tool.

It works by having an animation made to a specific object then, placing it within the animator depending on when you want said animation to occur or what you want it to be played in connection with or have connections for that matter.

Animator page
Animator showing open and closed states

I then proceeded to start the code with the help of the tutor as I had no idea how to link the animator and a C# script together. And this was the final outcome…

Ball_Trigger
Pressure activated door.

Continue reading “Synoptic: Filling out the tutorial room.”

Advertisements

3 years of studying Games Design: Part 1

This is a rare blog for me to write, and that’s because if you’re used to reading my blogs. It has been packed with subjects relating to my many years on game design at college.

Anyway, it’s about time I recap on how far I’ve come in since the first day on Level 2 Games design to the Next Gen games design course. The year is 2015 (definitely not a dramatic trailer intro), I come into college with an open mind and expecting to have a mind-set to someday create something cool.

I have many memories of coming to class and enjoying the roar of enthusiasm! Literally sometimes which was good but didn’t help with concentration to be honest and I’m sure that’s why the course asset requirements were a pair of headphones besides sound engineering.

Continue reading “3 years of studying Games Design: Part 1”

Keeping players comfortable & Wrapping up Pre-Production

Firstly, I would like to start this blog by saying

‘This is not easy to explain, yet again what is…’

Here is some back story, since I’m tech lead A.k.a programming and all the complicated stuff. I’m required to research game flows and how to implement that into the project.

That also means finding a way to make sure that the player feels comfortable playing the game hence keeping all of the main building blocks of gameplay in mind, take Mario for example. When Nintendo make Mario, doesn’t matter how late the player is in joining the franchise they’re always eased into the game with a series of tutorial levels that just seem to be either subtle reminders or testing the waters lets say.

Continue reading “Keeping players comfortable & Wrapping up Pre-Production”

Making ends meet

I am contributing this entire blog towards the creation of the 3D interactive menu for my imagine worlds project.

And the reason for this is because of what I figured out throughout the development stage of the buttons. I couldn’t understand that my imported graphics would not show at a full resolution. Instead was pixlated and fuzzy, therefore I had to seek out an alternate solution to make this menu.

‘What about 3D?’

So I looked into making 3D buttons where the materials will not bring down the resolution of the button graphics. Coming across a video that explained clearly how to achieve this but there was a brick wall ahead…

Although I though…

Going back a few steps, the unity forums held the answer ‘Can JavaScript & C# be used in the same scene’

JavaScript for Menu Button functionality

#pragma script

car QuitButton : boolean = false;

function OnMouseUp ()

{

if(QuitButton) {

Application.Quit ();

}

else

{

Application.LoadLevel (“DWU_4.7”);

}

}

So after writing this script, it was applied to the 3D planes mimicking the buttons, and classified them as play, credits & quit buttons. To make them therefore work in connection with the Button script.

The image below gives a visual representation of what I’m trying to achieve by doing this…

Buttons

Plane

Next was the animation, and this was quite familiar as the timeline keying features were like them of Maya. It was just a method of selecting the object you intend on animating, then to the animation box and moving the object into place to therefore build the animation. This is how I completed the animation for the menu transitions.

Menu Animation

 

Imagine Worlds project Update

This is an overall summary of the past 8 weeks, versions have been made with improvement to; character interaction, Sound and obviously graphics.

My biggest struggles throughout the project has been the programming; on the bright side, I have been trying to grasp the more common features of programming by looking through YouTube videos, Unity script references and even my own written code and seeing if there is any similarity between what I have done and trying to do.

Continue reading “Imagine Worlds project Update”

2D Solo Game – Week 3

Now all the pieces are coming together nicely, and the code is making more sense by the day. Especially with the layout, learning the difference between Allman & TBS1 bracketing.

===== 1TBS =====
while (x == y) {
    something();
    somethingelse();
}
===== Allman =====
while (x == y)
{
    something();
    somethingelse();

This basically shows different ways to layout the code so programmers can read it easily and make sense out of it. 1TBS shows the opening brackets connecting to the end of the first line of code which could represent the literal connection whereas Allman separates creates a new line for a new bracketing section… like a quarantine in a way. Keeps everything away.

PICKUP
Allman Bracketing (Physics Movement ‘Script’)

Doing either bracketing will not affect the workings of the code of what target you apply it to. Ultimately this should show what code is supposed to look like and also show an easier way of bracketing the code.  Below is an example of 1TBS bracketing, I wouldn’t expect you to read it all but if you want to, I highly recommend looking at the way the brackets are set in comparison to Allman.

Cone & Line of Sight

Back to the game in hand, there have been major improvements such as including collectable objects in my game to finally trigger the door, the idea.

  1. Get the Collectables.
  2. Avoid the Enemy.
  3. Get to the goal.

Simple, it’s just… making more levels & having the gameplay flow at an equilibrium alongside an increasing difficulty. Throughout the duration of the game…

GAMEPROG
collectable objects function / Recent progress

2D Solo game Week 1

Further venturing through the paths of game design and coding my way through the basics of my top down stealth game.

I start by creating my assets first, such as a protagonist ‘main character’, walls, enemy, a backdrop for my game, all I need now is a goal and I can reach further development. I create my assets all on Adobe Photoshop. By using the brush tool and tampering with the brush settings, I can give out better fake lights on the assets giving out a 3 Dimensional look without altering the lighting of the scene nor the renderer.

BRUSH SETTINGS
Brush settings tool

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Beginning my development on Unity, I made the mistake by selecting the game to be a 3D game, I had to therefore change the camera to ‘orthographic’ so of can therefore render the sprite images all together.

To conclude this blog I have also considered having a feature where the player must collect a specific object to therefore pass except the first stage which the player should be able to get to grips with the controls and the environment around him/her.

Projectiles_CODE

This piece of code is for a projectiles script which in simpler terms means ‘When shooting each bullet has two seconds until it is dead’, sounds odd… Bullets don’t die, but it does cease to exist after leaving the screen from source  within two seconds.